The Meaning of Du Hast: What It Is and How To Use It

Do you know the definition of du hast? This article will provide you with all of the information you need on the word du hast, including its definition, usage, example sentences, and more!

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What does the term du hast mean?

According to Lyrics Mode, the term Du Hast is the name of a 1997 Rammstein song, from the album Made in Germany. In this song, the term du hast has a double meaning. First, du hast means “you have” in German. However, this is a homonym for the phrase “du hasst” which means “you hate.” This gives the song a double meaning, as the lyrics could either mean that the person he is singing to has him or hates him. The lyrics can ead as either “you have me” or “you hate me,” represented by the German lyrics “du hast mich gefragt” or potentially “du hasst mich gefragt.” In the English version, the lyrics are usually written as “you have me” following the title of the song. This loses a bit of the double meaning and wordplay that the band was going for by using the homophones in the German language. Sometimes song meanings can change between languages.  

Rammstein is a Deutsch (German) metal band from Germany, also known as Deutschland. Band members include Till Lindemann, Richard Zven Kruspe, Christian Lorenz, Christoph Schneider, Oliver Riedel, and Paul Landers. The song’s German lyrics are below, from Song Facts.

Du

Du hast

Du hast mich

Du

Du hast

Du hast mich

Du

Du hast

Du hast mich

Du

Du hast

Du hast mich

Du

Du hast

Du hast mich

Du hast mich

Du hast mich gefragt

Du hast mich gefragt

Du hast mich gefragt und ich hab nichts gesagt

Du

Du hast

Du hast mich

Du hast mich

Du hast mich gefragt

Du hast mich gefragt

Du hast mich gefragt und ich hab nichts gesagt

Willst du bis der Tod euch scheidet

Treu ihr sein für alle tagen

Nein

Nein

Willst du bis der Tod euch scheidet

Treu ihr sein für alle tagen

Nein

Nein

Du

Du hast

Du

Du

Du hast

Du

Du

Du hast

Du

Du

Du hast

Du

Du

Du hast

Du hast mich

Du

Du hast

Du hast mich

Du

Du hast

Du hast mich

Du hast mich

Du hast mich gefragt

Du hast mich gefragt

Du hast mich gefragt und ich hab nichts gesagt

Willst du bis der Tod euch scheidet

Treu ihr sein für alle tage

Nein

Nein

Willst du bis zum Tod der scheide

Sie lieben auch in schlechten tagen

Nein

Nein

Willst du bis der Tod euch scheidet

Treu ihr sein

Nein

Nein

What are synonyms for the term du hast?

There are many different words that a person can use in place of the term du hast. In English, someone will likely not know what you mean if you use the term du hast. Therefore, it is useful to know English synonyms for the term du hast. This list of synonyms is provided by Thesaurus

  • carry
  • get
  • possess
  • bear
  • admit
  • teem with
  • own
  • get hold of
  • latch on to
  • annex
  • gain
  • have
  • enjoy
  • secure
  • sit on
  • accept
  • pick up
  • land
  • get hands on
  • take in
  • procure
  • chalk up
  • hold
  • corner
  • keep
  • have in hand
  • obtain
  • occupy
  • acquire
  • receive
  • hog
  • take
  • include
  • lock up
  • retain
  • compass

What are different translations for the term du hast?

The word have, used as a possessive, is present in a plethora of different languages. You may notice that many of these words look and sound similar to each other. This is likely due to them having a common origin. Often, cognates like this are formed when words have a similar ancestor such as Latin or Greek. This list of translations is provided by Word Sense.

  • Spanish: tener‎
  • Hebrew: use ל־‎ (l’-) + subject + יש‎ (yesh) + object; literally “to subject there is object”
  • Hallig and Mooring: heewe‎
  • Burmese: use subject + မှာ‎ + object + ရှိ‎; literally “object is at subject”
  • Aromanian: am‎
  • Lithuanian: turėti‎
  • Albanian: kam‎
  • Pennsylvania German: hawwe‎
  • Old Provençal: aver‎
  • Helgoland: hoa‎
  • Istriot: avì‎
  • Old Saxon: hebbian‎
  • Extremaduran: tenel‎
  • Alemannic German: haa‎
  • French: avoir‎
  • Dutch: hebben‎
  • Northern Thai: ᨾᩦ‎ (mi)
  • Vilamovian: hon‎
  • Urdu: پاس‎
  • Finnish: adessive + 3rd person singular of olla; omistaa, omata‎
  • Sicilian: aviri‎
  • Yiddish: האָבן‎
  • Norwegian: ha‎
  • Volapük: labön‎
  • Hawaiian: use he‎ + object + possessive form of subject
  • Vietnamese: có‎
  • Polish: mieć‎
  • Slovak: mať‎
  • Kurdish: hebûn‎, heyîn‎
  • Old French: avoir‎, aveir‎
  • Maltese: għandi‎ (I have), għandek‎ (you (sg.) have), għandu‎ (he has), għandha‎ (she has), għandna‎ (we have), għandkom‎ (you (pl.) have), għandhom‎ (they have)
  • Basque: izan‎
  • Föhr-Amrum and Sylt dialect: haa‎
  • Hindi: रखना‎ (rakhnā), पास‎, के‎
  • Russian: име́ть‎, usually expressed with expressions: у меня (есть) (u menjá (jestʹ)) – I have, у тебя (есть) (u tebjá (jestʹ)) – you have , etc. See у (2 – preposition)
  • Latin: habeō‎, teneo‎, possideo‎, sum‎ (with dative)
  • Ukrainian: мати‎ (máty), usually expressed with expressions: “у/в мене (є)” (u/v méne (je)) – I have, “у/в тебе (є)” (u/v tébe (je)) – I have – you have , etc. See у‎ (u) / в‎ (v)
  • Japanese: 持つ‎ (もつ, motsu); ある‎ (aru) (of inanimates), いる‎ (いる) (of animates)
  • Arabic: مَلَكَ‎, اِمْتَلَكَ‎, تَمَلَّكَ‎, usually no verb is used, prepositions: عِنْدَ‎, لِـ‎ (li-), etc. + noun or pronoun are used, e.g. عِنْدِي‎ – I have, عِنْدَك‎, عِنْدَك‎ – you have (m/f), etc.
  • Upper Sorbian: měć‎
  • Maori: whai‎
  • Greek: έχω‎
  • Hungarian: bír‎, birtokol‎, van -nak/-nek (attached to owner)
  • Persian: داشتن‎ (dâštan)
  • Romanian: avea‎
  • Norman: aver‎ (Jersey, Guernsey), aveir‎ (Guernsey)
  • Catalan: tenir‎
  • Occitan: aver‎
  • Old English: habban‎
  • Old Church Slavonic: имѣти‎
  • Lü: ᦙᦲ‎
  • Gamilaraay: -baraay‎
  • Neapolitan: avé‎, tené‎
  • Galician: ter‎
  • Lojban: ponse‎
  • Italian: avere‎
  • Friulian: vê‎
  • Swedish: äga‎, ha‎
  • Greenlandic: qar‎
  • Irish: use bí‎ + object + ag‎ + subject; literally “object is at subject”
  • Old Portuguese: tẽer‎
  • Macedonian: има‎ (íma)
  • Lao: ມີ‎
  • Novial: have‎
  • Thai: มี‎ (mee)
  • Malay: ada‎, punya‎, mempunyai‎
  • Min Dong: 有‎ (ou)
  • Interlingua: haber‎
  • Georgian: ფლობს‎, (inanimate) აქვს‎, (animate) ჰყავს‎
  • Tajik: доштан‎
  • Nepali: …सँग हुनु‎,
  • Portuguese: ter‎, possuir‎
  • Ancient Greek: ἔχω‎
  • Scottish Gaelic: use bi‎ + object + aig‎ + subject; literally “object is at subject”
  • Slovene: imeti‎
  • Tagalog: magkaroón‎
  • Piedmontese: avèj‎
  • Czech: mít‎
  • Danish: have‎
  • Korean: 있다‎
  • Breton: kaout‎, endevout‎
  • Armenian: ունենալ‎
  • Scots: hae‎
  • Mandarin: 有‎ (yǒu), 擁有‎, 拥有‎ (yōngyǒu)
  • Khmer: មាន‎ (mien)
  • Mongolian: байх‎
  • Sardinian: àere‎, ai‎, àiri‎
  • Low German: hebben‎
  • Faroese: hava‎
  • Zhuang: miz‎, miƨ‎
  • Asturian: tener‎
  • Esperanto: havi‎
  • Aragonese: tener‎
  • Cyrillic: имати‎
  • Romansch: avair‎, aver‎, haver‎, aveir‎
  • Dalmatian: avar‎
  • Belarusian: мець‎ (mjecʹ), usually expressed with expressions: “у мяне (ёсць)” (u mjanjé (josc’)) – I have, “”у цябе (ёсць)” (u cjabjé (josc’)) – you have , etc. See у‎ (u)
  • German: haben‎
  • Bulgarian: имам‎ (ímam)
  • Indonesian: punya‎
  • West Frisian: hawwe‎
  • Welsh: use bod‎ + object + gyda‎ subject; literally “object is with subject”
  • Roman: imati‎
  • Lower Sorbian: měś‎
  • Zulu: (subject concord +) na-‎
  • Icelandic: eiga‎, vera með‎
  • Turkish: sahip olmak‎ , usually expressed with expressions: “benim …(I)m var” – I have, “senin …(I)n var” – you have , etc.
  • Limburgish: höbbe‎, han‎

Overall, the phrase du hast

Sources:

  1. https://www.thesaurus.com/browse/have
  2. https://www.wordsense.eu/have/
  3. https://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/r/rammstein/du_hast_english_translation.html
  4. https://www.songfacts.com/lyrics/rammstein/du-hast