Grammar Tips

Offence vs. offense?

“Offence” and “offense” are different spellings of the same noun. “Offense” is standard for American English, while British English prefers to use “offence.”

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Offence vs. offense?

“Offence” and “offense” are different spellings of the same noun. “Offense” is standard for American English, while British English prefers to use “offence.”

Maybe vs. may be?

The word maybe is an adverb that means “perhaps” or “possibly.” “May be” is a verb phrase that sets a condition on how something might exist or occur.

Hanged vs. hung?

Only use “hanged” as the past tense of “hang” when discussing an execution or suicide. For all other meanings of “hang,” use “hung” as the past tense form.

Nauseous vs. nauseated?

Nauseous and nauseated both describe the feeling of nausea. However, the adjective nauseous traditionally means ‘to cause nausea,’ while the verb nauseated means ‘to feel nausea.’

Dreamed vs. dreamt?

Dreamed and dreamt are both past tense forms of the verb dream. The main difference is that “dreamt” is irregular and slightly more relevant for British English.

Skillset vs. skill set?

“Skill set” is an open, compound noun that means ‘one’s range or set of skills.’ “Skillset” and “skill-set” are incorrect spelling variants.

Conscience vs. conscious?

The noun conscience relates to one’s inner sense of right from wrong. The adjective conscious describes someone as awake and self-aware.

Dialog vs. dialogue?

“Dialogue” is an alternate spelling of “dialog,” which means ‘a conversation between two or more people’ or ‘the exchange of ideas.’

Clearer or more clear?

Clearer is the correct comparative adjective for describing something as “more clear.” If something is the “most clear,” use superlative “clearest.”

I vs. me?

“I” and “me” are subject pronouns that we use to reference ourselves. The difference is that “I” is a subject pronoun while “me” is an object pronoun.

Bunny vs. rabbit?

A rabbit is any small mammal of the order Leporidae that does not descend from the genus Lepus (aka hares). A bunny is simply a baby rabbit.

Bear vs. bare?

The verb bear means ‘to endure’ or ‘carry,’ while the verb bare means ‘to expose’ or ‘uncover.’