Grammar Tips

Cannot vs can not?

“Cannot” is the formal form of “can’t” and “can not.” English speakers can use “cannot” and “can not” interchangeably, but “cannot” is more common and accepted amongst English audiences.

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Cannot vs can not?

“Cannot” is the formal form of “can’t” and “can not.” English speakers can use “cannot” and “can not” interchangeably, but “cannot” is more common and accepted amongst English audiences.

Supper vs dinner?

English speakers use supper and dinner interchangeably to mean “evening meal.”

Learnt vs learned?

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Learnt (UK) and learned (US) are past tense forms of the irregular verb “learn.”

Presume vs assume?

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The verbs presume and assume each mean “take for granted,” but assume also describes the act of pretending, absorbing responsibility, or taking over a role.

Afterward or afterwards?

Americans use “afterward” for formal writing, but “afterwards” is the standard spelling outside of the United States.

Fiction vs. nonfiction?

Nonfiction writing recounts real experiences, people, and periods. Fiction writing involves imaginary people, places, or periods...

Attorney vs. lawyer?

An attorney is a lawyer that provides clients with legal representation. A lawyer is a legal practitioner that advises clients of their legal rights.

Affective vs. effective?

Effective is an adjective that describes how something produces a successful result.

Canceled vs. cancelled?

Canceled is the American spelling of the British English verb, cancelled.