Councilor vs. Counselor: What’s The Difference?

Counselor and councilor have the same sound. However, they have different definitions and should not be confused. So what’s the difference between them? Words in the English language that sound the same but have different meanings are called homophones or homonyms.

Your writing, at its best

Compose bold, clear, mistake-free writing with Grammarly's AI-powered writing assistant

What Is the Definition of the Word Counselor?

  • a person who counsels; adviser.
    • mental health professionals, social workers, family therapists, etc.
  • a faculty member who advises students on personal and academic problems, career choices, and the like.
    • school counselor, guidance counselor
  • an assistant at a children’s camp, often a high school or college student, who supervises a group of children or directs a particular activity, as nature study or a sport.
    • summer camp counselor
  • a lawyer, especially a trial lawyer; counselor-at-law.
    • legal counsel
  • a high ranking diplomat of an embassy or legation who ranks below an ambassador or minister with an important role.

What Is the Definition of the Word Councilor?

  • a member of a council like a city council, ex. councilwoman and councilman for the town

Synonyms of Counselor

Synonyms of Councilor

Etymology of the Word Counselor

The first recorded date you can trace counselor back to is in 1175-1225. In Middle English, it was spelled slightly different “counselier,” which was adapted to Middle English from Anglo-French “cunseiler”. 

Etymology of the Word Councilor

The word councilor can be traced back to the 1300s. This spelling was the replacement of the Middle English conselier and is commonly used in British English as opposed to American English. 

 Example Sentences of the Word Councilor in Context

Example Sentences of the Word Counselor in Context

Summary

You are now more than informed on the differences between counselor and councilor. You can now confidently use them correctly in sentences and know which one is correct for your use case. Hopefully, you also took away some other helpful information surrounding these two words. 

Sources: 

  1. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23534/23534-h/23534-h.htm
  2. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16451/16451-h/16451-h.htm
  3. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17249/17249-h/17249-h.htm
  4. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/47703/47703-h/47703-h.htm
  5. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26442/26442-h/26442-h.htm
  6. http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/02/11/uk-clinics-abortion-leads-to-sex-abuse-and-cancer.html?source=dictionary
  7. http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/05/04/st-hippolytus-careers-christians-should-never-have.html?source=dictionary
  8. http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/05/30/the-first-modern-school-shooter-feels-responsible-for-the-rest.html?source=dictionary
  9. http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/06/16/the-buddhist-punk-reforming-drug-rehab.html?source=dictionary
  10. http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/10/25/orthorexia-when-healthy-eating-becomes-an-obsession.html?source=dictionary
  11. https://www.voiceofsandiego.org/topics/news/morning-report-police-reformers-are-coming-for-mts/
  12. https://www.outsideonline.com/2416426/social-media-work-toxic-coping-strategies?utm_campaign=rss&utm_source=rss&utm_medium=xmlfeed
  13. https://www.voiceofsandiego.org/topics/government/mts-frequently-overrules-doctors-orders-on-reduced-fares-for-the-disabled/
  14. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/47192/47192-h/47192-h.htm
  15. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/25472/25472-h/25472-h.htm
  16. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20154/20154-h/20154-h.htm
  17. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/22892/22892-h/22892-h.htm
  18. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/30691/30691-h/30691-h.htm
  19. http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/08/05/brazil-hetero-pride-day-bill.html?source=dictionary