Grammar Tips

Good vs. well?

Use the adjective “good” to describe nouns and the adverb “well” to describe verbs. But if you’re discussing “good health,” use the adjective “well.”

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Is vs are?

“Is” and “are” are linking verbs for the present tense of “to be.” English uses “is” for singular nouns and “are” for plural nouns.

Port vs starboard?

The words port and starboard are nautical terms that describe the right and left sides of a water vessel.

Incase or in case?

Incase is not the same as the phrase "in case." Incase is a spelling variant of the verb encase and means ‘to enclose’ or ‘cover.’

Ageing vs. aging?

The words ageing and aging are alternate spellings of the same word, but “ageing” is more common outside of the United States and Canada.

Gage vs. gauge?

Gage and gauge often share the same meaning, but “gauge” is the preferred English spelling for topics regarding measurement, estimation, or mathematics.

Compliment vs Complement: What’s the difference?

The two words ‘compliment’ and ‘complement’ can often be confusing for those not sure of their differences.

Defence vs Defense: What’s the difference?

The two words ‘defence’ and ‘defense’ can often be confusing for those not sure of their differences.

Has vs have?

“Has” and “have” appear together for the present and perfect tenses of the verb “to have.”

Cannot vs can not?

“Cannot” is the formal form of “can’t” and “can not.” English speakers can use “cannot” and “can not” interchangeably, but “cannot” is more common and accepted amongst English audiences.